Centenary of ANZAC 2014-2018

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When World War 1 began in 1914, Canterbury’s population was only 19,000 people, but many of our local young men volunteered for service because they were patriotic and wanted to support Great Britain, considered to be Australia’s “mother country”.┬áResearch uncovered more than 1900 men from the Canterbury district who volunteered to fight in Australian forces in the war. Three hundred and fifty of them were killed and many came back disabled. The loss and disablement of so many local men would have had a huge impact on the small Canterbury community.

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CENTENARY OF ANZAC

Stories from the War

The Maxwell Family of East Hills

The Maxwell Family of East Hills

Edward Henry and Maxwell (nee Neale) were one of the earliest families to settle in the East Hills area of Canterbury-Bankstown. Sands directory shows Edward Henry Maxwell residing in Tower...

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Edward Spalding

Edward Spalding

Edward Lawrence Spalding volunteered during WWI. Because his profession was groom (employed in the stables at Tooheys) he was attached to the 7th Light Horse Regiment Veterinary Corps. His ship...

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Thomas Richard Keating

Thomas Richard Keating

Thomas Richard Keating was the third of seven surviving children, and was their eldest son of Janet and Richard. Tom was born while the family were living in St Marys, but to date there is no...

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War Memorials

St Saviour’s Anglican Church

Roll of Honour in St Saviour’s Anglican Church...

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King and Empire honour roll

King and Empire honour roll in St John’s Church of...

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Old Boys of Moorfields School

The Old Boys of Moorfields School Honour Roll was...

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They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

Lest We Forget